If you hear the word “damnation!” exclaimed at Cinecenta next Wednesday or Thursday, it won’t necessarily be the sound of someone swearing.

It refers to the title of a film about the proliferation of dams in the U.S., which though erected with good intentions, also have a dark side.

The topic is addressed in two eco-documentaries — DamNation and Return of the River — that celebrate measures to reverse the damage construction of such behemoths has done to the environment.

Return of the River, sponsored by Washington State’s Coastal Watershed Institute, Raincoast Conservation Foundation, Surfrider Vancouver Island, Patagonia, the University of Victoria and Ocean Students Society, focuses on the demolition of Glines Canyon Dam, which began operating in 1927, and the Elwha Dam on the Elwha River, which flows from the Olympic Mountains to Juan de Fuca Strait.

While these dams powered industry on the Olympic Peninsula, they also blocked salmon migration and devastated fish stocks, sparking protests and court action by Washington aboriginal tribes.

The film, screening Wednesday at 7 p.m. shows how the Elwha project reflects a new era of dam-removal environmentalism in the U.S., a trend it suggests could soon sweep Canadian river systems.

In DamNation, Thursday at 7 p.m., the impact a dam has on a river’s behaviour, and shifting attitudes toward massive projects that were once viewed with pride is explored with a fusion of stunning cinematography, historical context and humour.

The importance of such “community supported and beautifully presented” films cannot be understated, said Joel Hibbard, Victoria wilderness activist and general manager of Sitka retail store.

“They remind us of our power and responsibilities as citizens,” he said. “They’re an example of the kind of communication tools that are at the core of our democracy and the ideals that give us the ability to take pride in ourcommunity, our province and ultimately our nation.”

If this program doesn’t whet your appetite for dam-themed films, Night Moves might do the trick Friday and Saturday, 7 p.m., at the Vic Theatre.

Kelly Reichardt’s thriller stars Jesse Eisenberg, Dakota Fanning and Peter Sarsgaard as three radical environmentalists who plot to blow up a hydroelectric dam in Oregon.

Eisenberg’s chillingly restrained performance as an eco-warrior haunted by the consequences of his actions, and Fanning’s portrayal of a guilt-ridden rich girl who bankrolls their dangerous plot, are the main reasons this meditation on misguided radicalism is worth checking out.

- See more at: http://www.timescolonist.com/some-fine-dam-films-hitting-victoria-next-week-1.1378397#sthash.UKE5ayH3.dpuf

If you hear the word “damnation!” exclaimed at Cinecenta next Wednesday or Thursday, it won’t necessarily be the sound of someone swearing.

It refers to the title of a film about the proliferation of dams in the U.S., which though erected with good intentions, also have a dark side.

The topic is addressed in two eco-documentaries — DamNation and Return of the River — that celebrate measures to reverse the damage construction of such behemoths has done to the environment.

Return of the River, sponsored by Washington State’s Coastal Watershed Institute, Raincoast Conservation Foundation, Surfrider Vancouver Island, Patagonia, the University of Victoria and Ocean Students Society, focuses on the demolition of Glines Canyon Dam, which began operating in 1927, and the Elwha Dam on the Elwha River, which flows from the Olympic Mountains to Juan de Fuca Strait.

While these dams powered industry on the Olympic Peninsula, they also blocked salmon migration and devastated fish stocks, sparking protests and court action by Washington aboriginal tribes.

The film, screening Wednesday at 7 p.m. shows how the Elwha project reflects a new era of dam-removal environmentalism in the U.S., a trend it suggests could soon sweep Canadian river systems.

In DamNation, Thursday at 7 p.m., the impact a dam has on a river’s behaviour, and shifting attitudes toward massive projects that were once viewed with pride is explored with a fusion of stunning cinematography, historical context and humour.

The importance of such “community supported and beautifully presented” films cannot be understated, said Joel Hibbard, Victoria wilderness activist and general manager of Sitka retail store.

“They remind us of our power and responsibilities as citizens,” he said. “They’re an example of the kind of communication tools that are at the core of our democracy and the ideals that give us the ability to take pride in ourcommunity, our province and ultimately our nation.”

If this program doesn’t whet your appetite for dam-themed films, Night Moves might do the trick Friday and Saturday, 7 p.m., at the Vic Theatre.

Kelly Reichardt’s thriller stars Jesse Eisenberg, Dakota Fanning and Peter Sarsgaard as three radical environmentalists who plot to blow up a hydroelectric dam in Oregon.

Eisenberg’s chillingly restrained performance as an eco-warrior haunted by the consequences of his actions, and Fanning’s portrayal of a guilt-ridden rich girl who bankrolls their dangerous plot, are the main reasons this meditation on misguided radicalism is worth checking out.

- See more at: http://www.timescolonist.com/some-fine-dam-films-hitting-victoria-next-week-1.1378397#sthash.UKE5ayH3.dpuf

If you hear the word “damnation!” exclaimed at Cinecenta next Wednesday or Thursday, it won’t necessarily be the sound of someone swearing.

It refers to the title of a film about the proliferation of dams in the U.S., which though erected with good intentions, also have a dark side.

The topic is addressed in two eco-documentaries — DamNation and Return of the River — that celebrate measures to reverse the damage construction of such behemoths has done to the environment.

Return of the River, sponsored by Washington State’s Coastal Watershed Institute, Raincoast Conservation Foundation, Surfrider Vancouver Island, Patagonia, the University of Victoria and Ocean Students Society, focuses on the demolition of Glines Canyon Dam, which began operating in 1927, and the Elwha Dam on the Elwha River, which flows from the Olympic Mountains to Juan de Fuca Strait.

While these dams powered industry on the Olympic Peninsula, they also blocked salmon migration and devastated fish stocks, sparking protests and court action by Washington aboriginal tribes.

The film, screening Wednesday at 7 p.m. shows how the Elwha project reflects a new era of dam-removal environmentalism in the U.S., a trend it suggests could soon sweep Canadian river systems.

In DamNation, Thursday at 7 p.m., the impact a dam has on a river’s behaviour, and shifting attitudes toward massive projects that were once viewed with pride is explored with a fusion of stunning cinematography, historical context and humour.

The importance of such “community supported and beautifully presented” films cannot be understated, said Joel Hibbard, Victoria wilderness activist and general manager of Sitka retail store.

“They remind us of our power and responsibilities as citizens,” he said. “They’re an example of the kind of communication tools that are at the core of our democracy and the ideals that give us the ability to take pride in ourcommunity, our province and ultimately our nation.”

If this program doesn’t whet your appetite for dam-themed films, Night Moves might do the trick Friday and Saturday, 7 p.m., at the Vic Theatre.

Kelly Reichardt’s thriller stars Jesse Eisenberg, Dakota Fanning and Peter Sarsgaard as three radical environmentalists who plot to blow up a hydroelectric dam in Oregon.

Eisenberg’s chillingly restrained performance as an eco-warrior haunted by the consequences of his actions, and Fanning’s portrayal of a guilt-ridden rich girl who bankrolls their dangerous plot, are the main reasons this meditation on misguided radicalism is worth checking out.

- See more at: http://www.timescolonist.com/some-fine-dam-films-hitting-victoria-next-week-1.1378397#sthash.UKE5ayH3.dpuf

If you hear the word “damnation!” exclaimed at Cinecenta next Wednesday or Thursday, it won’t necessarily be the sound of someone swearing.

It refers to the title of a film about the proliferation of dams in the U.S., which though erected with good intentions, also have a dark side.

The topic is addressed in two eco-documentaries — DamNation and Return of the River — that celebrate measures to reverse the damage construction of such behemoths has done to the environment.

Return of the River, sponsored by Washington State’s Coastal Watershed Institute, Raincoast Conservation Foundation, Surfrider Vancouver Island, Patagonia, the University of Victoria and Ocean Students Society, focuses on the demolition of Glines Canyon Dam, which began operating in 1927, and the Elwha Dam on the Elwha River, which flows from the Olympic Mountains to Juan de Fuca Strait.

While these dams powered industry on the Olympic Peninsula, they also blocked salmon migration and devastated fish stocks, sparking protests and court action by Washington aboriginal tribes.

The film, screening Wednesday at 7 p.m. shows how the Elwha project reflects a new era of dam-removal environmentalism in the U.S., a trend it suggests could soon sweep Canadian river systems.

In DamNation, Thursday at 7 p.m., the impact a dam has on a river’s behaviour, and shifting attitudes toward massive projects that were once viewed with pride is explored with a fusion of stunning cinematography, historical context and humour.

The importance of such “community supported and beautifully presented” films cannot be understated, said Joel Hibbard, Victoria wilderness activist and general manager of Sitka retail store.

“They remind us of our power and responsibilities as citizens,” he said. “They’re an example of the kind of communication tools that are at the core of our democracy and the ideals that give us the ability to take pride in ourcommunity, our province and ultimately our nation.”

If this program doesn’t whet your appetite for dam-themed films, Night Moves might do the trick Friday and Saturday, 7 p.m., at the Vic Theatre.

Kelly Reichardt’s thriller stars Jesse Eisenberg, Dakota Fanning and Peter Sarsgaard as three radical environmentalists who plot to blow up a hydroelectric dam in Oregon.

Eisenberg’s chillingly restrained performance as an eco-warrior haunted by the consequences of his actions, and Fanning’s portrayal of a guilt-ridden rich girl who bankrolls their dangerous plot, are the main reasons this meditation on misguided radicalism is worth checking out.

- See more at: http://www.timescolonist.com/some-fine-dam-films-hitting-victoria-next-week-1.1378397#sthash.UKE5ayH3.dpuf

If you hear the word “damnation!” exclaimed at Cinecenta next Wednesday or Thursday, it won’t necessarily be the sound of someone swearing.

It refers to the title of a film about the proliferation of dams in the U.S., which though erected with good intentions, also have a dark side.

The topic is addressed in two eco-documentaries — DamNation and Return of the River — that celebrate measures to reverse the damage construction of such behemoths has done to the environment.

Return of the River, sponsored by Washington State’s Coastal Watershed Institute, Raincoast Conservation Foundation, Surfrider Vancouver Island, Patagonia, the University of Victoria and Ocean Students Society, focuses on the demolition of Glines Canyon Dam, which began operating in 1927, and the Elwha Dam on the Elwha River, which flows from the Olympic Mountains to Juan de Fuca Strait.

While these dams powered industry on the Olympic Peninsula, they also blocked salmon migration and devastated fish stocks, sparking protests and court action by Washington aboriginal tribes.

The film, screening Wednesday at 7 p.m. shows how the Elwha project reflects a new era of dam-removal environmentalism in the U.S., a trend it suggests could soon sweep Canadian river systems.

In DamNation, Thursday at 7 p.m., the impact a dam has on a river’s behaviour, and shifting attitudes toward massive projects that were once viewed with pride is explored with a fusion of stunning cinematography, historical context and humour.

The importance of such “community supported and beautifully presented” films cannot be understated, said Joel Hibbard, Victoria wilderness activist and general manager of Sitka retail store.

“They remind us of our power and responsibilities as citizens,” he said. “They’re an example of the kind of communication tools that are at the core of our democracy and the ideals that give us the ability to take pride in ourcommunity, our province and ultimately our nation.”

If this program doesn’t whet your appetite for dam-themed films, Night Moves might do the trick Friday and Saturday, 7 p.m., at the Vic Theatre.

Kelly Reichardt’s thriller stars Jesse Eisenberg, Dakota Fanning and Peter Sarsgaard as three radical environmentalists who plot to blow up a hydroelectric dam in Oregon.

Eisenberg’s chillingly restrained performance as an eco-warrior haunted by the consequences of his actions, and Fanning’s portrayal of a guilt-ridden rich girl who bankrolls their dangerous plot, are the main reasons this meditation on misguided radicalism is worth checking out.

- See more at: http://www.timescolonist.com/some-fine-dam-films-hitting-victoria-next-week-1.1378397#sthash.UKE5ayH3.dpuf

If you hear the word “damnation!” exclaimed at Cinecenta next Wednesday or Thursday, it won’t necessarily be the sound of someone swearing.

It refers to the title of a film about the proliferation of dams in the U.S., which though erected with good intentions, also have a dark side.

The topic is addressed in two eco-documentaries — DamNation and Return of the River — that celebrate measures to reverse the damage construction of such behemoths has done to the environment.

Return of the River, sponsored by Washington State’s Coastal Watershed Institute, Raincoast Conservation Foundation, Surfrider Vancouver Island, Patagonia, the University of Victoria and Ocean Students Society, focuses on the demolition of Glines Canyon Dam, which began operating in 1927, and the Elwha Dam on the Elwha River, which flows from the Olympic Mountains to Juan de Fuca Strait.

While these dams powered industry on the Olympic Peninsula, they also blocked salmon migration and devastated fish stocks, sparking protests and court action by Washington aboriginal tribes.

The film, screening Wednesday at 7 p.m. shows how the Elwha project reflects a new era of dam-removal environmentalism in the U.S., a trend it suggests could soon sweep Canadian river systems.

In DamNation, Thursday at 7 p.m., the impact a dam has on a river’s behaviour, and shifting attitudes toward massive projects that were once viewed with pride is explored with a fusion of stunning cinematography, historical context and humour.

The importance of such “community supported and beautifully presented” films cannot be understated, said Joel Hibbard, Victoria wilderness activist and general manager of Sitka retail store.

“They remind us of our power and responsibilities as citizens,” he said. “They’re an example of the kind of communication tools that are at the core of our democracy and the ideals that give us the ability to take pride in ourcommunity, our province and ultimately our nation.”

If this program doesn’t whet your appetite for dam-themed films, Night Moves might do the trick Friday and Saturday, 7 p.m., at the Vic Theatre.

Kelly Reichardt’s thriller stars Jesse Eisenberg, Dakota Fanning and Peter Sarsgaard as three radical environmentalists who plot to blow up a hydroelectric dam in Oregon.

Eisenberg’s chillingly restrained performance as an eco-warrior haunted by the consequences of his actions, and Fanning’s portrayal of a guilt-ridden rich girl who bankrolls their dangerous plot, are the main reasons this meditation on misguided radicalism is worth checking out.

- See more at: http://www.timescolonist.com/some-fine-dam-films-hitting-victoria-next-week-1.1378397#sthash.UKE5ayH3.dpuf

If you hear the word “damnation!” exclaimed at Cinecenta next Wednesday or Thursday, it won’t necessarily be the sound of someone swearing.

It refers to the title of a film about the proliferation of dams in the U.S., which though erected with good intentions, also have a dark side.

The topic is addressed in two eco-documentaries — DamNation and Return of the River — that celebrate measures to reverse the damage construction of such behemoths has done to the environment.

Return of the River, sponsored by Washington State’s Coastal Watershed Institute, Raincoast Conservation Foundation, Surfrider Vancouver Island, Patagonia, the University of Victoria and Ocean Students Society, focuses on the demolition of Glines Canyon Dam, which began operating in 1927, and the Elwha Dam on the Elwha River, which flows from the Olympic Mountains to Juan de Fuca Strait.

While these dams powered industry on the Olympic Peninsula, they also blocked salmon migration and devastated fish stocks, sparking protests and court action by Washington aboriginal tribes.

The film, screening Wednesday at 7 p.m. shows how the Elwha project reflects a new era of dam-removal environmentalism in the U.S., a trend it suggests could soon sweep Canadian river systems.

In DamNation, Thursday at 7 p.m., the impact a dam has on a river’s behaviour, and shifting attitudes toward massive projects that were once viewed with pride is explored with a fusion of stunning cinematography, historical context and humour.

The importance of such “community supported and beautifully presented” films cannot be understated, said Joel Hibbard, Victoria wilderness activist and general manager of Sitka retail store.

“They remind us of our power and responsibilities as citizens,” he said. “They’re an example of the kind of communication tools that are at the core of our democracy and the ideals that give us the ability to take pride in ourcommunity, our province and ultimately our nation.”

If this program doesn’t whet your appetite for dam-themed films, Night Moves might do the trick Friday and Saturday, 7 p.m., at the Vic Theatre.

Kelly Reichardt’s thriller stars Jesse Eisenberg, Dakota Fanning and Peter Sarsgaard as three radical environmentalists who plot to blow up a hydroelectric dam in Oregon.

Eisenberg’s chillingly restrained performance as an eco-warrior haunted by the consequences of his actions, and Fanning’s portrayal of a guilt-ridden rich girl who bankrolls their dangerous plot, are the main reasons this meditation on misguided radicalism is worth checking out.

- See more at: http://www.timescolonist.com/some-fine-dam-films-hitting-victoria-next-week-1.1378397#sthash.UKE5ayH3.dpuf
If you hear the word “damnation!” exclaimed at Cinecenta next Wednesday or Thursday, it won’t necessarily be the sound of someone swearing.

It refers to the title of a film about the proliferation of dams in the U.S., which though erected with good intentions, also have a dark side.

The topic is addressed in two eco-documentaries — DamNation and Return of the River — that celebrate measures to reverse the damage construction of such behemoths has done to the environment.

Return of the River, sponsored by Washington State’s Coastal Watershed Institute, Raincoast Conservation Foundation, Surfrider Vancouver Island, Patagonia, the University of Victoria and Ocean Students Society, focuses on the demolition of Glines Canyon Dam, which began operating in 1927, and the Elwha Dam on the Elwha River, which flows from the Olympic Mountains to Juan de Fuca Strait.

While these dams powered industry on the Olympic Peninsula, they also blocked salmon migration and devastated fish stocks, sparking protests and court action by Washington aboriginal tribes.

The film, screening Wednesday at 7 p.m. shows how the Elwha project reflects a new era of dam-removal environmentalism in the U.S., a trend it suggests could soon sweep Canadian river systems.

In DamNation, Thursday at 7 p.m., the impact a dam has on a river’s behaviour, and shifting attitudes toward massive projects that were once viewed with pride is explored with a fusion of stunning cinematography, historical context and humour.

The importance of such “community supported and beautifully presented” films cannot be understated, said Joel Hibbard, Victoria wilderness activist and general manager of Sitka retail store.

“They remind us of our power and responsibilities as citizens,” he said. “They’re an example of the kind of communication tools that are at the core of our democracy and the ideals that give us the ability to take pride in ourcommunity, our province and ultimately our nation.”

If this program doesn’t whet your appetite for dam-themed films, Night Moves might do the trick Friday and Saturday, 7 p.m., at the Vic Theatre.

Kelly Reichardt’s thriller stars Jesse Eisenberg, Dakota Fanning and Peter Sarsgaard as three radical environmentalists who plot to blow up a hydroelectric dam in Oregon.

Eisenberg’s chillingly restrained performance as an eco-warrior haunted by the consequences of his actions, and Fanning’s portrayal of a guilt-ridden rich girl who bankrolls their dangerous plot, are the main reasons this meditation on misguided radicalism is worth checking out.